Family of woman killed by self-driving auto settles with Uber

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In a letter sent Monday to Uber CEO Dara Khosrowshahi, Ducey called the incident an "unquestionable failure" to meet public safety expectations.

When it did so, it make big changes to its sensor design: the number of LIDAR sensors were reduced from five to just one - mounted on the roof - and in their place, the number of radar sensors was increased from seven to 10. The company voluntary suspended their tests in Arizona, California, Pittsburgh, and Toronto following the crash.

Uber is still allowed to operate in Pennsylvania, the state said in a statement that they will "ensure any restart of testing is done with safety as the top priority". At a lunchtime roundtable with reporters in Washington, Lyft president John Zimmer seemed to agree that the vehicle and backup driver should have intervened, based on the sequence of events in the video.

In an effort to protect their reputations, an auto parts maker and a software company have both spoken out about their respective technologies as they relate to the Uber self-driving vehicle that crashed.

Just over a week ago, a self-driving Uber auto struck and killed a pedestrian in Tempe, Arizona.

An Uber spokesperson said that Ron's departure is unrelated to the crash, and that he was no longer working on any self-driving vehicle technology prior to leaving. Ducey said at the time that shows Arizona is friendlier for business than its neighbor to the west. The governor's office said it provided the emails to the newspaper in September. "We're welcoming this technology". Toyota Motor Corp and chipmaker Nvidia Corp have also suspended self-driving auto testing on public roads, as they and other companies await the results of an ongoing investigation into the Tempe incident, which is believed to be the first death of a pedestrian struck by a self-driving vehicle. Unlike California, Arizona does not have a permitting system for autonomous vehicles.

"These cars are going to be insured, " he responded.

Arizona Gov. Doug Ducey gloated in a tweet accompanying a story about the Uber cars leaving California: "This is what OVER-regulation looks like!" "From the beginning we've been very public about the testing and operation of self-driving vehicles, and it has been anything but secret".

Experts who have viewed the video footage of the crash in Tempe agree that Uber's sensors should have spotted 49-year-old Elaine Herzberg crossing the street. All indications are that the vehicle did not brake before hitting her, suggesting that it did not "see" her. Uber argued that they didn't need it, since their vehicles are technically not capable of "self-driving" on their own.

Baidu, the operator of China's largest online search engine, has completed the country's first autonomous driving road test based on a 5G network environment, seen as a major step for the internet giant in its push towards driverless auto technology.

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