Pennsylvania special election loss stoking fears of suburban 'revolt' vs. GOP

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"I see similarities between Doug Jones and Conor Lamb and myself", he said.

Seventy thousand more voters are registered as Democrats in that district than Republicans. One espies the same truckling of moneyed interests in the handful of Blue Dog senators in red states who hope that their cooperation with Republicans in a partial rollback of Dodd-Frank financial regulations will help them secure their re-election in a tough midterm environment.

Trump's trick was also a gamble that depended on the public ignoring the obvious fact that anything short of a big Saccone win would be a humiliating loss for the President.

The issue is complicated by Trump's dismissal last week of Rex Tillerson, his first secretary of state, in part because of the former ExxonMobil chief's general support of the Iran nuclear deal negotiated during the Barack Obama years. Like every other election in Pennsylvania, there were Election Day whispers about voting irregularities, none of which ever end up checking out. The president dismissed Saccone's opponent as "Lamb the sham".

"There is a very real problem facing Republicans in the months ahead and that problem is Donald Trump's approval rating", Heye said. The National Republican Campaign Committee and Paul Ryan's Congressional Leadership Fund each poured about $ 3.5 million into the race, with $1.3 million from the Republican National Committee and another $ 1.6 million from two Trump-aligned PACs.

Murphy had been elected to eight consecutive terms beginning in 2002, running unopposed in the past two cycles.

Lamb has declared victory over Saccone and holds a narrow lead that experts believe will likely hold up as the last ballots are counted.

"Pointing to areas of policy disagreement is always important, as is litigating a candidate's past to properly inform the electorate of just who this person is", said Jesse Hunt, a spokesman for the National Republican Congressional Committee, the House GOP's political arm that spent heavily on ads in the Pennsylvania race.

"I think you can't deny that and if you do, you're lying", Cramer said.

"I feel pretty confident that we're going to win, we're going to win big", she said.

With redistricting, Lamb's home will be redrawn into the new 17th district, where he could face incumbent Republican Representative Keith Rothfus. The New York Times declared Lamb the victor Wednesday night, calling the Democrat's lead insurmountable.

From 2014 to 2017, Conor Lamb served as an assistant USA attorney in Pittsburgh, where he led prosecutions against drug dealers and violent criminals.

Lamb is pro-gun, personally anti-abortion but politically pro-abortion rights and devotedly pro-union.

Though some progressives may be tempted to skip the celebrations, Democrat Conor Lamb's victory over Republican Rick Saccone in the special election for the 18thCongressional District in Pennsylvania is worth saluting. They are there in black and white in actual bills that are sitting in the U.S. Congress that are awaiting a vote ... He opposes Republican attempts to repeal Obamacare and supports abortion rights.

Lamb raised almost $3.9 million during his campaign.

The race in Pennsylvania's 18th District had still not been officially called.

"All other things being equal, wouldn't a Republican running in a Republican district do better than a Democrat allegedly pretending to be a Republican?" If seats like Pennsylvania's 18th are competitive, than Democrats are likely feeling good about reaching that 23-seat goal.

Whether Democrats can replicate what Lamb did in a district with influential labor unions and a long tradition of coal mining and steel-making remains to be seen.

Saccone's Elizabeth Township residence would remain in the new version of the 18th, which would also be largely Democratic.

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